What is a Hot Tub Sanitizer and Which Sanitizer is the Best?

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A hot tub sanitizer kills bacteria and purifies the water. The sanitizer is the most critical component to a healthy hot tub experience.
Hot Tub Sanitizers

There are many sanitizers on the market. Some are great, some are mediocre and some are terrible. Below, I’ll take you through the different sanitizing options and the pros and cons of each.

Chlorine

Chlorine is the most widely used sanitizer for pools. Because it does not come in tablet form, it is not a suitable stand-alone sanitizer for spas, as the granules dissipate too quickly.

Chlorine is a great shock for hot tubs and is commonly used in conjunction with mineral sanitizers, burning off dead organic matter and preventing cloudy water.
Chlorine

Bromine

Bromine is the most widely used hot tub sanitizer. It comes in tablets which can be inserted into a floating bromine feeder and provide continuous sanitization to the water.

While very effective at killing bacteria, some people may have a sensitivity to bromine. Some individuals experience dry or irritated skin and find the chemical odor of bromine to be overwhelming. Learn more about bromine.
BromineTablets

Cons of Chlorine & Bromine

Excessive use of halogen sanitizers (chlorine and bromine) can bleach and damage the underside of the spa cover, fade swim suits and even pit the hot tub shell.

 

Mineral Sanitizers

There are a couple “alternative hot tub sanitizers” on the market that use copper or silver ions to sanitize spa water. Many people switch to mineral sanitizers because they are odorless, more natural, and do not fade swimsuits or damage spa covers.

  • Cleanwater Blue – Cleanwater Blue is an EPA registered liquid bactericide/algaecide made from copper ions. These ions disrupt the cell structure of microorganisms, eliminating them in a safe way.The science behind Cleanwater Blue dates back to ancient times, when drinking water vessels were made from copper to help keep the water fresh. While crossing the plains, American settlers often put copper pennies into their water barrels to prevent stagnation.

Cleanwater Blue Sanitizer

  • Nature 2 – Nature 2 is an EPA Registered cartridge containing silver minerals, which you can put in your filter cartridge or in the filter housing. As water passes through the Nature 2 cartridge, positively charged silver ions disperse in the water, and destroy negatively charged cells of microorganisms.Like Cleanwater Blue, this systems is a great alternative for people who have a bromine sensitivity and is comparable in price.

Nature2 Mineral Sanitizer

Cons of Mineral Sanitizers

While there are no major cons to using mineral sanitizers, using test strips with these systems can be somewhat tricky. To date, there is no practical way for users to test silver ion content, so care must be taken to follow dosage instructions.

Bromine/Chlorine + Mineral Sanitizers

  • Spa Frog – Spa Frog sanitizing systems combine minerals and a small amount of bromine to achieve sanitization in hot tub water. By incorporating minerals, the amount of bromine needed is greatly reduced.Spa Frog systems are a great option for people that like the test-ability of bromine and the benefits of mineral sanitizers.

Spa Frog Mineral Sanitizer

  • PoolRX – Despite its name, PoolRX is a great mineral sanitizer for spas. This product works synergistically with a constant low level of chlorine.

Pool RX

Ozonators

Ozonators, or ozone generators, are add-on components in hot tubs that distribute ozone through the air lines. Ozone works to break down contaminants in hot tubs by oxidization, destroying bacteria, soap residues and other undesirable particulate on contact.  Ozone also frees up spent chlorine and bromine particles, enabling them to be reused again and again and allowing you to use far less chemicals to maintain sanitization.

Ozone has a very short half-life in water (about 15 minutes) and must be used in conjunction with a sanitizing agent, such as Bromine, Cleanwater Blue or Nature 2.
Aqua Sun Ozone

Cons of Ozone

Excessive ozone can cause damage to the underside of spa covers and thermal blankets.

Salt Systems

Saltwater based systems, such as the Saltron Mini, generate chlorine by passing a mild electric current through salt water. Salt, which is added to the spa water, is the source of the chlorine which acts as the sanitizer with this system.
Salt Systems

The ease of use with these systems makes them very popular. Many people also experience softer, more moisturized skin after soaking in a hot tub equipped with a salt system.

The low salinity level required with these systems does not corrode spa equipment. Learn more about salt systems.

Cons of Salt Systems

The cells which generate the chlorine require some cleaning maintenance.

Biguanides

Biguanide sanitizers are commonly hydrogen peroxide based and require proprietary companion water balancing products.

Cons of Biguanide Sanitizers

Biguanides are known to erode certain plastic components, such as jets, causing them to no longer stay in place. Biguanides and their proprietary companion components are significantly more expensive than most other sanitizing systems. Many people report coughing and burning sensations in the lungs and eyes after inhaling steam in hot tubs treated with biguanide sanitizers. Commercial Hydrogen Peroxide used in hot tubs can be dangerous to store, handle and transport. Biguanide sanitizers often fail to prevent algae slime.

Mystery Ingredient Systems

There are several mystery ingredient “water treatments” on the market which claim that you can “throw away all of your other chemicals” and “use this product and never test your water again”.

Beware! These products survive by using irresponsible and dangerous marketing. The small print on these products state that they do not kill bacteria.  The truth is that these products are mostly comprised of dissolved salts in water. Truly not worth the $100+ price tag.
Silk Balance

If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is.

So, Which is the Best?

It is clear that mineral systems are gaining huge popularity. Being that they are odorless, gentle on the skin and hot tub equipment, and comparable in price to chlorine/bromine sanitizing systems, it’s not hard to understand why.

Do you have questions about your hot tub water maintenance? Comment below for expert assistance!

49 comments

  1. we ordered the Nature 2 mineral cartridge from your company. we are also using the spa sanitizer granules. is how we are supposed to be using it. we bought the kit. feed back would be appreciated . have 6 pounds of bromine but do not want to use it.. due to reading about the effects bromine can have on the health of a person. thanks

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  2. I use Bromine but have found by using a filter when filling the water stays better much longer and chemical use is minimal! Saves lots of money

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  3. We currently us chlorine and Nature 2 for our hot tub. My husband has a sensitive skin issue and is sometimes bothered by the hot tub. I am thinking about switching to the Cleanwater Blue system. If I do should I also continue to use the Nature 2 or is it not necessary with Cleanwater Blue?

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  4. Hi Cindy,
    Thank you for your comment. Once you switch to the Cleanwater Blue, you no longer need to use the Nature 2 Cartridge, and the CleanWater Blue (blue box) is also a mineral sanitizer.
    Some skin sensitivity may also result for low or high pH levels, so be sure to test and balance these every other week with the Cleanwater Blue system.
    Please let me know if you have any additional questions.
    Thank you,
    Kaisa
    SpaDepot.com

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  5. Hi Sharon,
    Thank you for your comment.
    Yes, Sanitizing Granules are compatible (when used as an occasional shock) with the Nature 2 system. You don’t want to use bromine with Nature 2.
    Here is a link to the Nature 2 maintenance tips & instructions: http://www.spadepot.com/docs/KT1005.pdf
    Please let me know if you have any additional questions.
    Thank you,
    Kaisa
    SpaDepot.com

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  6. hi I’m using the natures 2 in my hot tub ,now that summer’s coming around wanted to know if we could turn the temperature way down and just use the Jets so more less trying to say no hot water just jets what do I need to use to keep the water sanitized

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  7. Hi Misty,
    You can turn the hot tub down to the lowest setting and use the jets. The lowest setting is probably going to be around 85 degrees F. Once the temperature in the tub gets lower than 85 degrees, the jets will turn off while the tub heats back up to the setting.
    I hope this is helpful. Please let me know if you have any additional questions.
    Thank you,
    Kaisa
    SpaDepot.com

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  8. Nice information on hot tub sanitizers. I have done swimming and in my pool they mostly use Chlorine as sanitizer, I was not aware that there are other options. I always have a bath have contact with swimming pool water because I don’t want Chlorine to effect my skin. But I don’t swim so often just once a while.

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  9. Hi, I use chlorine granules and Nature2 in my Tiger River spa. I’ll be out of town for a couple weeks, and I thought I heard somewhere that a good idea is to drop a chlorine tablet into the filter tube (where I put the Nature2, just above it), so it will dissolve slowly while I’m gone. But the tablets you sell are Trichlore, and the description says they are not recommended for spas.
    Do you it’s a good idea nevertheless, or is there a better way? Or is there such a thing as regular chlorine tablets (maybe I’m not searching correctly)?
    Thanks! –Larry

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  10. Hi Larry,
    Thank you for your comment, I’m happy to help!
    You never want to use Trichlor in a hot tub, as it will destroy spa plumbing and equipment (it is intended for larger pools). However, you can use Bromine Tablets in a floating feeder:
    http://www.spadepot.com/shop/Bromine-Tablets-15-lbs-P607C43.aspx
    http://www.spadepot.com/shop/Floating-Bromine-Chlorine-Dispenser-Feeder-P609C43.aspx
    Once you return, you will just want to test and balance your water as usual. You may need to add a little bit more Oxy Spa Oxidizing Shock than normal.
    I hope this is helpful. Please let me know if you have any additional questions.
    Thank you,
    Kaisa
    SpaDepot.com

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  11. I have an Infinity spay that is 12 years old. have been using chlorine and hate it, so I don’t use it as soften as I’d like to. I was thinking of swtching to saline purifiying, but was told it would ruin my piping ,etc. Is the saline safe for the equipment? Also, what would you recommend, the hot tub holds less than 700 gallons of water.
    thanks
    susan

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  12. Hi Susan,
    Thank you for your comment. I’m happy to help!
    Salt systems work by converting salt to natural chlorine, so if it’s the chlorine aspect you don’t like, I would recommend switching to a mineral sanitizer. Lots of folks who dislike chlorine and bromine really like the Cleanwater Blue or Nature 2 systems.
    Spa grade chlorine does not come in tablet form, and the granules dissipate too quickly to be effective, so chlorine is not considered to be an effective stand-alone sanitizer for hot tubs. Pool grade chlorine (trichlor) which does come in tablet form is far too potent to use in hot tubs, as it will damage the plumbing and equipment.
    Bromine is a good alternative if you like the effectiveness of spa chlorine, but are looking to decrease time spent maintaining the water.
    I hope this is helpful. Please let me know what additional questions you have.
    Thank you,
    Kaisa
    SpaDepot.com

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  13. I changed to the Cleanwater Blue system on you recommendation about a month ago. I have had nothing but problems with it. The chemistry gets out of whack ecery couple of days. The water gets cloudy every other day. Even though I haven’t put any of the Cleanwater Blue liquid in since the first day, the test strips show high levels of copper. I’m at my wits end — about ready to toss it for something else. It doesn’t seem to work. What am I doing wrong. The test strips for the copper level are always grey. And I’m changing the filter twice a week because it turns green. .?????

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  14. Hi Skipper,
    I’m sorry you are having issues with the Cleanwater Blue system! It can be a very easy to use system, but there is a bit of a learning curve when you first start up.
    The greenish tint to the filter is a symptom that the copper is coming out of solution, which can be from either pH and Alkalinity being out of balance, or too much copper, or a combination of both. With the CWB system, it’s very important that the pH and Alkalinity are balanced before you add anything else to the water, since the Cleanwater Blue locks the pH and Alkalinity in place. If the water is not balanced, it can cause the copper to come out of solution and cause cloudiness, and it is very difficult to balance the water after the copper is added.
    The easiest solution would be to drain a foot or two of water out of your tub and refill with fresh water. If using well water, be sure to use a hose-end filter that removes any excess minerals or metals that may make balancing your water difficult. You can then adjust your pH and Alkalinity to the correct range and test for copper again, adding the amount suggested on the quick-start guide. Be sure to shock after every time you get out with the Oxy-Spa non-chlorine shock, and if you have occasional cloudiness you can always add a small dose of the Spa Sanitizing granules (dichlor).
    I hope this helps, and if you have any more issues, we’re happy to troubleshoot with you!
    Thanks,
    Bonni
    SpaDepot.com

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  15. Hi Spadepot, I just purchased a Coleman Lay-z-spa and have been reading this blog about water treatment. I am sooooo lost!!! Bromine, Chlorine, etc. Can you recommend a water treatment regimen (chemicals, test strips, etc) for this type of spa? I’m looking for the easiest and least time consuming methods to treat the water. I purchased Leisure brand bromine tablets along with the spa, but after reading this blog, I’m just not sure how to even begin treating the water, much less maintaining it in the most efficient, effective and safest way. Please help. I need the total package and I’m ready to order!

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  16. Hi Claude,
    Thank you for your comment. For the least amount of maintenance and testing, we recommend the Clearwater Blue system. This sanitizing program only requires bi-weekly testing and balance, as opposed to the weekly required by most other sanitizers. It is also extremely effective.
    Here’s a link to the start-up kit which includes everything you need for this system and comes with thorough step-by-step instructions: http://www.spadepot.com/shop/Cleanwater-Blue-Pro-Supplies-Kit-P438C67.aspx
    I hope this is helpful. Please let me know if you have any additional questions.
    Thank you,
    Kaisa

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  17. We used the flush to clean the spa out two times after it had been sitting for six months waiting for a blower repair. Now we cannot get a salt like buildup on the shell to come off. You wipe it down and next day it is back. I put new filters, use your balancing products and no positive results.
    It is a white, salty like buildup. Feels almost like sand on the sides and bottom of the spa.

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  18. Hi Tonya,
    Thank you for your comment. I’m happy to help!
    You’re experiencing minerals that have come out of solution, most likely calcium. Are you on well water?
    To remove the scale you’ll want to use a calcium sequestrate, such as Spa Defense: http://www.spadepot.com/shop/Spa-Defense-32-oz-P9184C635.aspx
    You can also use a Pre-Fresh Hose End Filter to prevent this during your next refill: http://www.spadepot.com/shop/PreFresh-Spa-Pool-Water-Fill-Filter-P784C632.aspx
    You can use a little bit of Spa System Flush on a rag to remove the scale that is clinging to the spa shell.
    I hope this is helpful. Please let me know if you have any additional questions.
    Thank you,
    Kaisa
    SpaDepot.com

    Like

  19. My wife and I just got a new hot tub and are learning about the chemicals, when we use the test strips we have been getting high MPS reading it’s very purple what can you do to reduce the MPS or is it not to be worrying about?

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  20. We have a Hot Springs spa that we just switched over to the Cleanwater blue system. We were using the Hot Springs system which used a continuous silver ion sanitizer thing in one of the filters. Should we remove it or continue to use the silver ion sanitizer?

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  21. Hi Dan,
    Thank you for your post. You’ll only need the Cleanwater Blue system, as it is a complete sanitizer. There is no need to use both systems at the same time, and you may run into compatibility issues if you do.
    I hope this is helpful. Please let me know if you have any additional questions.
    Thank you,
    Kaisa

    Like

  22. WE purchased this : Aqua Sun XL-80 Universal Ultra Long Life CD Ozone System with Injector 120/240V I have a dual speed pump.My question is does this unit only dispense ozone when needed because it shuts off at high speed??

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  23. Hi Debbie,
    Thank you for your post. The ozonator only runs during your automatic filtration cycle, so if the spa is switched to another mode, the ozonator will automatically shut off. No harm is done, the ozonator will turn on again when your spa goes back into filtration mode.
    Please let me know if you have any additional questions.
    Thank you,
    Kaisa

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  24. We are using the Nature 2 cartridges and adding your OxySpa MPS after each use with a chlorine shock once a week in our Bullfrog hot tub. We have heard that we need to leave our spa cover off for 20 minutes after adding chlorine. Living in a northern climate, we try to not leave our cover open more than necessary. My question is when we add the MPS after each use can we shut the cover immediately or do we have to leave it open for a period of time? Does having an ozonator make a difference with being able to shut the lid for these oxidizers?

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  25. Hi John,
    Thank you for checking with us! It is a good idea to leave the cover off after adding both chlorine and Oxy Spa to the spa water. Leaving the cover off every time will certainly prolong the lifetime of your cover. I recommend leaving the cover off for 10-15 minutes after adding chlorine or Oxy Spa. You might also consider getting a ThermoFloat Spa Blanket. ThermoFloat Blankets prevent evaporation, so they’ll not only help right after you add chemicals, they will help prevent evaporation into the cover when the cover is on. We have them available here:
    http://www.spadepot.com/shop/Floating-Blankets-Coveralls-C637.aspx
    I hope this helps! Please let me know if you have any other questions.
    Thanks,
    Mark
    SpaDepot.com

    Like

  26. Thanks Mark. The floating blanket looks like a good idea for saving energy and protecting the cover. I am disappointed to learn that the Oxy Spa will damage the cover like chlorine if I shut it right after its added. That adds up to a lot of extra time uncovered when it is below freezing outside. Does the Oxy Spa not work as well in a hot tub that is covered?

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  27. Hi John,
    I appreciate you checking back with me, and that is a good question. Leaving your cover off after you add chemicals, any chemicals, is only to help increase the longevity of the cover. That’s really it. If you added chemicals and immediately closed the cover, any off-gasses from the chemicals are going to sit between the water and the cover. If you use the proper amount of chemicals and keep your water balanced, closing your cover right after you add chemicals is only going to slightly shorten the life of the cover. There are lots of hot tub owners that close their covers right after adding chemicals, and their covers lasts more than 10 years. There are also hot tub owners out there that don’t balance their water, use way too much sanitizer and ruin a brand new cover in less than one year.
    Considering the potential heat loss in the winter, I would actually recommend putting your cover right back on in cold weather, and leaving it off for a few minutes during the warmer months. As long as you keep everything balanced and use the ThermoFloat Blanket, your cover will last many, many years.
    Please let me know if you have any other questions!
    Thanks again,
    Mark
    SpaDepot.com

    Like

  28. I want to switch my spa from chlorine to Cleanwater blue. Do I need to drain the tub and fill with clean water to make this switch??

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  29. If you are Using chlorine and the nature to stick. Can you use a bromine floater while you’re out of town? Is that what you were saying to Larry? I have the same question So just wanted to make sure I understood your answer. I did not think you could mix chlorine and bromineLike that.

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  30. Hi Debby,
    I’m sorry for what seems like conflicting information! You should always use bromine instead of trichlor tablets, since trichlor is meant for pools and is too strong. But while the Nature 2 cartridge is inserted, only dichlor chlorine or non-chlorine shock should be used since bromine can coat the silver ions in the cartridge.
    As far as treating the spa when you are on vacation, you can give the water a shock with dichlor before you leave and shock again when you get back, and the Nature 2 cartridge should do the rest. Turning down the heat a bit will also encourage cleaner water since microbes love hot water.
    Thanks,
    Sarah
    SpaDepot.com

    Like

  31. Help! Started using a Saltron about 18 months ago with mineral salts. Have always had the salt level and Saltron settings to keep water normal. Have never had to add additional salt. Spa is used maybe once a week. Test and adjust for PH etc at least whenever spa is used. The blue plastic edges of my spa filter are dissolving and I noticed my plastic headrests are rough at the water line. My jets are flying off right and left with plastic corrosion issues. My heater died and has since been replaced. I removed all the water and refilled and am awaiting a new filter and jets to be shipped. What on earth caused all these problems? I have owned spas for over 30 years and have never seen anything like this. Is this due to the salt water?

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  32. Hi Amy,
    It sounds like your chlorine time may be set too high, since high levels of chlorine degrade plastic. I would recommend testing to see how much chlorine is in the spa on a regular basis, and adjusting the chlorine time based on the test strip.
    Thank you,
    Sarah
    SpaDepot.com

    Like

  33. Woo Hoo, our new hot tub will be here Friday. Already loaded-up on the Nature 2 cartridges. The spa dealer said the spa comes with a starter kit, and we can’t wait for our new ‘party pond’!

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  34. I purchased my Hot Tub new around 4months ago. After approx 1 month I was using with Wife and daughter and afterwards we all got an infection. Spots and Swollen lymph nodes under arms. I thought I had been following the instructions but decided to start again so after the infection subsided we dumped the water and started again this time making sure I was following the instructions more closely. Again a few weeks later myself and my wife got the infection back. Whats going on? The tub is 1000 ltrs, using nature stick and Lithium @ 1 teaspoon per bather each use. Shock once a week and pressure clean the filters. PH in range. Most recent event there was a little foam but not much. Can anyone offer any suggestions? I’m usually the only one in and everyone else is too scared now and I shower before going in to make sure the TDS is keppt as low as possble. Please any assistance would be appreciated.

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  35. Hi,
    I’m sorry you are having so much trouble with your spa! First, we would recommend doing a complete spa decontamination. This will not only start you off with fresh water, but clean out your plumbing, which can harbor harmful microbes. Read our instructions for decontaminating here:
    http://www.spadepot.com/spacyclopedia/spa-contamination.htm
    One more note: Lithium is not the best choice of chlorine to add to a spa. Lithium hypochlorite is not stabilized, has a high pH, and is a less concentrated amount of chlorine than granular dichlor, the only chlorine recommended for hot tubs. In the future, you may want to switch to dichlor to better keep up with the hot, high bather load environment of a hot tub.
    I hope we can get your hot tub under control again soon! Let me know if you have any further questions.
    Thanks,
    Sarah
    SpaDepot.com

    Like

  36. Hello, I am thankful to find a good guide for hot tubs. We are trying to determine who makes the best hot tub. We want a 6 person tub and Hot Springs has been recommended to us. However, I have read other firms marketing materials and they sound pretty good too. We want a spa that will last and that will provide a strong massage flow. Can you advise who are the best two or three manufacturers and follow up service providers and the strengths/weaknesses of each?

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  37. I have 360 gal spa. I use nature 2 stick along with OXY-SPA mps, and tablespoon of di-chlor (1x per week). My water is clear but green tinted. Any ideas why?

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  38. Hi Dan,

    Have you flushed your plumbing recently? We recommend using Spa System Flush (http://www.spadepot.com/shop/Spa-System-Flush-16-oz-P436C57.aspx) to super-clean the inside of your hot tub plumbing. It will flush grime, oily residue and heater scale deposits that may be hiding, even if your jetted tub is well maintained.

    To use: remove filter, add half a bottle (8 oz.), run pumps and jets for a few minutes (or overnight if possible) then drain away the gunk with the old water. And that’s it!

    Thanks,
    Rosy,
    SpaDepot.com

    Like

  39. I am very puzzled as to why you state that the trichlor tablets are too strong for use in spas. This makes no sense whatsoever. Chlorine is chlorine, wherever you get it. I see absolutely no reason you couldn’t use the trichlor tablets in an adjustable floater turned to a low setting for slow release. It does have a lot more chlorine content than the dichlor granules, but if you start at a low output setting and make small adjustments, it should be just fine. Please clarify the reasoning behind your oft-repeated statement.

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  40. Hi SilverSolver,

    Great question! We don’t recommend trichlor tablets for a few reasons.

    First, when we say trichlor tablets are made for pools, we mean it. They put out HUGE doses of chlorine and stabilizer.

    For example, a typical 1″ 3 oz. chlorine tablet will put out about 2ppm of free chlorine in a 10,000 gallon pool. The average spa is 25 times smaller than that, and a single table would output 52ppm free chlorine in a 400 gallon spa. I don’t think a floater can be adjusted so low to dissolve a single 1″ tablet in enough time to use up 52ppm of free chlorine.

    All chlorine forms are not 100% pure chlorine. The different forms of chlorine have different pH, and Trichlor, like dichlor, has stabilizer (CYA) in it that keeps the chlorine in check and prevents it from degrading in sunlight. However, over 50ppm CYA makes chlorine less efficient. Trichlor tablets will add to build-up of CYA over time.

    In addition, pools do not use spa covers or headrests. In the contained environment of a spa, that harsh chlorine will dissolve the headrests and cover. To trichlor’s credit, bromine in large doses can also do a number on your cover and headrests.

    Trichlor is also extremely acidic (2.9pH), which isn’t a big deal in 10,000+ gallons. In a spa, a chemical that acidic will corrode and destroy your heater and other components. Daily adjustment would be required, which defeats the purpose of using tablets in the first place.

    Lastly, spa manufacturer’s often have clauses that void the warranty or won’t cover damage caused by trichlor tabs because of the issues mentioned above.

    Hopefully I shed some light on why we don’t recommend trichlor tabs and you will consider going a different route. Let me know if you have any questions.

    Thanks,
    Sarah
    SpaDepot.com

    Like

  41. Your reply is slightly puzzling, since elsewhere on your website (http://www.spadepot.com/spacyclopedia/Chlorine-W18.aspx) you state “We do not recommend this type of chlorine for spas because it has a higher acidic nature, and generally dissolves too slowly to be effective.” A high total alkalinity should stabilize the pH to where keeping it at a reasonable range doesn’t require daily addition of alkaline material to correct the pH, and if it dissolves slowly, there should be a setting on a suitable floater which would provide an appropriate level of chlorination. http://www.spadepot.com/Floating-Bromine-Chlorine-Dispenser-Feeder-P609C43.aspx is an example of such a feeder. They can expose anywhere from 0 to 6+ tablets to the water as needed for proper dispersal.

    This is theoretical to me at this point, as I have never attempted this. As I have free access to all the supplies in question and expendable old hot tubs, I probably will try this at some point because this whole discussion and my research has left the issue clear as mud. :O I want to have accurate knowledge on the subject as I am “The Chemist” at a small hot tub store.

    Like

  42. Hi SilverSolver,

    Thank you for bringing this conflicting information to my attention. I believe that SpaCyclopedia article is referring to the fact that Trichlor tabs (not unlike bromine tabs) are not effective immediately, and you would have to use an alternative chlorine product anyway. It’s apparent that article could use a refresh.

    Raising the alkalinity significantly could keep the relative pH stable for longer periods of time, but would not be enough to prevent all acid damage. When the pumps are off and no water is flowing past the floater, the water immediately surrounding the floater becomes extremely chlorinated and acidic, causing damage to whatever the floater happens to hover near, like headrests, skimmers and covers (as it off-gasses).

    Our goal is to make water chemistry easy for our customers, and although it might be an interesting experiment for someone that wouldn’t mind replacing a few heater elements or covers, we would never recommend using trichlor because of how easy it is to get out of control. Since spa size, filtration times, bather load, chlorine demand, circulating pumps, ozonators and UV systems can all change the requirements of chlorine and dissolve time, there is no possible way for us to come up with a dosage that could be safe and damage-free for all spas. All use would have to be trial and error and at the risk of the customer and their spa.

    If you decide to go through with it, let us know how everything works out for you!

    Thanks,
    Sarah
    SpaDepot.com

    Like

  43. Hi Larry,

    We noticed your comment and are unable to provide you with an unbiased answer since SpaDepot.com offers its own brands: Belize Acrylic Spas and LifeCast RotoMold Hot Tubs. Doing research and comparing each manufacturer to your wish list (think of where you wish to place it, warranty, standard features, etc). Hopefully this narrows down your list to 2 or 3 models. Service providers vary in each state and will be dependent on the make/model of your spa.

    We hope this helps!

    Thank you,
    Rosy
    SpaDepot.com

    Like

  44. Of course! When you make the final decision, our Hot Tub Blog does provide an unbiased view of hot tub care, cleaning and maintenance for any brand.

    Thanks,
    Rosy
    SpaDepot.com

    Liked by 1 person

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