Fall Hot Tub Maintenance – 4 Things You Must Do!

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Fall Hot Tub Care

 

Hot tubs can last 30+ years if properly maintained. For almost two decades we’ve helped hot tub users across the globe find parts and fix hot tubs they weren’t sure could be revived. We know what it takes to keep your hot tub running and looking great. Here are the 4 things you must do to prepare your hot tub for fall:

 

1. Drain & Refill

Your hot tub water should be changed once every 3-4 months. After using it all summer long, you should drain and refill it with fresh water. Proper water care is essential for the life of your hot tub (and the health of the people using it).
Fall Hot Tub Maintenance Tips

If your water source is high in mineral content, the use of a PreFresh Filter will greatly reduce potential scale buildup on your heater and spa shell, and will make balancing the water much easier.

 

2. Clean Your Filter

A dirty, clogged, or worn out filter can cause damage to your spa pump and cause cloudy or foamy water. During each water change and about once per month, remove your filter and give it a thorough cleaning. Replace filters that have been in use for more than 1 year (6 months if heavy bather load).

Clean your filter with a non-foaming filter cleaner, such as Power Soak.

Replace your filter with a quality brand pleated filter, such as Clarathon Filter Cartridges.
Fall Hot Tub Maintenance Tips

3. Protect Your Spa Cover

Your spa cover needs periodic maintenance to keep it looking its best. Cleaning and treating the cover with protectant can add years to its life and save you a bundle of money.

Clean your cover with a non-abrasive vinyl cleaner, such as CleanAll Spray.

Protect your cover with 303 Protectant (the only protectant recommended for vinyl spa covers).

 

Fall Hot Tub Maintenance Tips

 

Before the rainy weather starts, it is also very important to inspect your cover for any tears or holes. Patch these immediately to prevent your cover from becoming waterlogged. Read more about patching your hot tub cover.

 

4. Spa Cabinet Care

Spa cabinets are the most commonly neglected part of a hot tub, and yet have the most impact on appearance. Keep your spa cabinet looking beautiful by cleaning it every 3-4 months and treating it with the proper method.

Fall Hot Tub Maintenance Tips

Wood Hot Tub Cabinets

Wood hot tub cabinets require annual linseed oil/staining treatment. Read more about Wooden Hot Tub Cabinet Maintenance. If your wooden hot tub cabinet is beyond the point of refinishing, you can preserve it by painting. Read more about Painting Your Hot Tub Cabinet.

 

Composite Spa Cabinets

Composite spa cabinets can be cleaned and protected with the same method that you use to care for your spa cover. It is important to always use a non-abrasive cleaner and an oil-free protectant to preserve the original condition of your hot tub.
Fall Hot Tub Maintenance Tips

These are the 4 simple steps to keep your hot tub looking and functioning like new!

Have questions or comments about Fall Hot Tub Maintenance? Comment below for free expert advice!

10 comments

  1. Agree completely with the points in this article and probably even more relevant than ever for the wet and wild UK weather in Autumn and Winter.
    Why not consider a new cover for the harsh Winter season ahead as well.

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  2. I have a repair question. We drained our spa to clean it and I thought my wife killed the breaker and she thought I had. Needless to say something bad happened. The spa works but it took 6 days to heat up and only the low pressure jets are working. I ordered a heating element from SpaDepot and replaced it but that didn’t fix it. I think it may be the pump motor but what would your recommendation be? Thanks

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  3. Hi Trey,
    Thank you for checking with us. Based on the symptoms you are having, I recommend having the voltage tested going to the pump motor. Since you’re having trouble with the tub heating slowly, and you’re missing one of the speeds on your pump, that does suggest the problem are with the spa pack. Testing the voltage going to the pump motor will let you know which component is bad. If you are getting the proper voltage to the motor, the motor is bad and will need to be replaced. If you’re not getting the proper voltage when the motor should be in high speed, then the problem is with the power pack.
    Hope this helps!
    Thanks,
    Mark
    SpaDepot.com

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  4. Great Tips for Hot Tub Maintenance. I’ve also found that a “magic eraser” is a great cleaning tool for removing any scum-line build up on the inside of the spa and or cover.

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  5. Great tub! Looking fab. Also, thanks for sharing some helpful tips. I would like to know, aren’t wooden hot tubs harder to maintain?

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  6. Hi Nick,
    Wood skirted hot tubs are definitely more work intensive than synthetic, as they must be treated seasonally to maintain their beauty. For this reason many spa manufacturers are building only spas with synthetic cabinets.
    Even so, there are still quite a few older wood hot tubs out there and they can look years younger with a bit of sanding and treatment. For some helpful tips, see our article on restoring wooden hot tub cabinets:
    https://hot-tub-blog.spadepot.com/2014/04/restoring-wooden-hot-tub-cabinets-furniture.html
    Thanks,
    Sarah
    SpaDepot.com

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  7. I really like your tip about keeping your spa cabinet looking good by cleaning it every 3-4 months and treating it with proper care. My husband and I love the look of our hot tub so we try to have the cabinet cleaned every few months. It’s good to know that 3-4 months of cleaning is the recommended time frame, I will be sure to pass these tips on to my husband.

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